Home > Celebrations, noynoy aquino > how should citizens respond to noynoy aquino’s “no wang wang” policy- give way to noynoy aquino’s convoy

how should citizens respond to noynoy aquino’s “no wang wang” policy- give way to noynoy aquino’s convoy

we think aquino should use the wang wang and the bus lane to go to places around the city. we think as president of this country, he deserves the courtesy and the honor.

but if noynoy aquino continues to follow his no wang wang policy, we should applaud him and admire him for his humility. let us return this grand and honorable gesture by doing this – LET US GIVE WAY TO NOYNOY AQUINO’s convoy.

when we see his entourage at the back of our vehicle, let us give way, move our car to the curb and stop our car and allow noynoy aquino, the president of the country to pass. that is a small gesture that we can do to return to aquino’s humility and desire for rerspect for each other.

aquino has enforced the no wang wang policy to show that he, the president of the country respects others. by giving way, it is our way to return the respect and honor the position of aquino as president of the country.

  1. mariles
    July 5, 2010 at 7:25 am

    this is a good idea. let us support this.

  2. jundp
    July 5, 2010 at 2:27 pm

    mariles :
    this is a good idea. let us support this.

    grow up .. he can use a chopper .. duh?!

  3. July 7, 2010 at 9:43 am

    from http://antipinoy.com/in-the-news-wall-street-journal-weighs-in-on-noynoys-first-two-days/#comment-18186

    Word has it that when Noynoy Aquino was still a candidate, there was a group in his billionaire-backed campaign team that was assigned to handle international media relations. As a result, Aquino received positive coverage from some foreign news outlets. This added steam to the bandwagon effect Philippine media was doggedly building around his campaign.

    Now that he is president, Aquino’s people are expected to devote much more effort than Gloria Arroyo ever did to managing his public image in the Philippines and overseas. That means more “media relations”.

    That makes these two articles published by the Asian Wall Street Journal during Aquino’s first two days in office all the more interesting to read. These two reports give an alternative point of view to the emo reporting of the yellow media, who in the days after Aquino’s inauguration pounced on his ‘wang-wang’ soundbite with a flood of newspaper editorials and TV reports, with one evening newscast devoting 15 to 30 minutes of coverage to the holy ‘wang-wang’ utterance as though Aquino had announced a cure for cancer.

    The first WSJ article is an op-ed published on June 30, 2010, the day of the inauguration. The second WSJ article is a news report published the next day, July 1, 2010.

    Here are some excerpts for you to mull over and share with people you know who are starved for grown-up, realistic reporting on Aquino.

    “NOYNOY’S PHILIPPINE PROMISES”
    The country needs investment, not bigger government and higher taxes
    WSJ, Opinion Asia, June 30, 2010

    It’s hard to find anything Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III didn’t promise Filipinos in his inaugural address Wednesday…..But one big thing was missing: a solid program of economic reform.

    Mr. Aquino did acknowledge the need to make the Philippines “attractive to investors”…..That message will be especially well-received by foreigners who have largely shunned the country…..Yet in the same breath the new president also repeated populist promises he made on the campaign trail, including a nod to universal health care and education and government-run employment programs for the poor.

    Populism may be popular but it’s expensive, and it’s unclear how Mr. Aquino intends to pay for it…..Mr. Aquino says he’ll raise public monies by improving the country’s miserably low tax collection rates. Previous administrations have made similar pledges, with limited success. Corruption is endemic, and without a serious effort to prosecute big-name offenders Mr. Aquino won’t get far.

    A better approach would be to combine that anticorruption crackdown with a far-reaching growth agenda. Mr. Aquino could slash the country’s 30% corporate tax rate and simplify the tax system to encourage a positive cycle of investment, growth and job creation—and, eventually, more tax revenue. He could also work to liberalize trade and investment regimes and continue to sell off state assets.

    If he doesn’t, pressure will mount for him to raise taxes, which would send more investment fleeing. His own finance secretary, Cesar Purisima, was the primary cheerleader—also as finance secretary—behind the last government’s tax hikes. If he reverts to form, Mr. Aquino would do well to ignore him or install a more creative thinker.

    *****
    “AQUINO’S GRAFT PROBE SPARKS FEARS FOR ECONOMY”
    WSJ, Asia News, July 1, 2010

    A decision this week by Philippine president Benigno Aquino III to launch high-profile investigations into alleged corruption during his predecessor’s administration may help burnish his antigraft credentials. But it could also complicate his efforts to push much-needed economic and investment reforms, analysts warned.

    Swept into office in May largely on a promise to clean up Philippine politics, Mr. Aquino said Tuesday that one of his first acts will be to create a Truth Commission to probe the corruption he and his backers say flourished under former President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo.

    Mr. Aquino has suggested the commission will focus on cases involving Ms. Arroyo and her allies, many of whom retain powerful positions in the Philippine government and judiciary. Those include claims of fraud in Ms. Arroyo’s 2004 presidential-election victory and a case in which her husband allegedly received kickbacks in the award of a $330 million broadband contract to a Chinese company.

    The Arroyos have denied charges of wrongdoing and Ms. Arroyo ultimately canceled the broadband deal.

    Some of the biggest cases already have been investigated over recent years, but didn’t result in the high-level convictions some had sought. Critics of the latest effort, including some economists and political analysts, question whether the complaints merit more time and money—and potential fallout. Ms. Arroyo is a member of Congress, just elected in May, and still commands respect in some circles, including among many foreign investors who credit her with stabilizing the Philippine economy over the past decade. Those critics say they prefer Manila focus on fiscal reforms that will help lift the economy.

    Manila said it is focused on economic issues. But Mr. Aquino and many rank-and-file Filipinos also seek answers to the lingering allegations of fraud and graft.

    Many supporters of Mr. Aquino expect action from a man whose mother, the late Corazon Aquino, was lionized for taking on entrenched interests when she was president in the late 1980s. She dedicated much effort to investigating former dictator Ferdinand Marcos and his allies, who historians believe stole billions of dollars before he was succeeded by her following a 1986 People Power revolt.

    But some economists fault Corazon Aquino for allowing the anticorruption drive to take primacy over key financial reforms needed to prevent the Philippines from slipping behind faster-growing neighbors in Southeast Asia. They fear Mr. Aquino is following the same path.

    “Obviously it’s laudable to have goals of cleaning up government, but you also have to implement laws,” which requires a good relationship with other policy makers—including potentially some allied with Ms. Arroyo—says Frederic Neumann, an economist at HSBC in Hong Kong. “If you come in too aggressively to try to clean up corruption, that might backfire,” he adds.

    Whatever happens, “it will distract him from evolving his strategy,” says Alex Magno, a political-science professor at the University of the Philippines.

    Backers of Mr. Aquino argue that if he takes on graft, it will ultimately benefit the Philippines more than any other reforms by helping restore confidence that the country is governed by the rule of law. The Philippines ranked 139th out of 180 countries in a recent corruption index by Transparency International, a graft-watching group.

  4. July 7, 2010 at 9:50 am

    No more Bull$@*& and media blitz…..Filipinos are demanding to see any changes when it comes to economic outlook and plans to have a solid economy. No more wang wang and change of Independence date Bull%&$# talks. We want to see you do some action than lip service. Stupid ABS-CBN spends more time talking about wang wang.Why don’t you taunt and dare him to talk about investment, tourism, and start fulfilling his campaign promises. What his actual plan in the works to attract more investment for the country. Any plans to travel abroad to seek investment?

    • July 9, 2010 at 8:45 pm

      You miss the whole point, Joseph. Haven’t you heard about the Broken Glass Principle?

      • July 9, 2010 at 8:56 pm

        The wang-wang may be a minor thing to you. But to us ordinary citizens, it shows that our president feels the pulse of his people. The Wang-wang is a broken window that needs to be fixed so the greater issue of politics abuse and government corruption will be stopped if not minimized. Then your investments (and all the other major things you mentioned) will follow…

  5. July 9, 2010 at 8:36 am

    Joseph :

    No more Bull$@*& and media blitz…..Filipinos are demanding to see any changes when it comes to economic outlook and plans to have a solid economy. No more wang wang and change of Independence date Bull%&$# talks. We want to see you do some action than lip service. Stupid ABS-CBN spends more time talking about wang wang.Why don’t you taunt and dare him to talk about investment, tourism, and start fulfilling his campaign promises. What his actual plan in the works to attract more investment for the country. Any plans to travel abroad to seek investment?

    since inauguration, aquino has in fact all action and zero lip service. he has given clear marching orders to the members of his cabinet to fix their own departments and change things for the better. the cabinet secretaries on their own have in fact taken action. we are just on day 9 and have have seen everyone in the cabinet take action.

    the no wang wang policy is in fact an excellent example of all action, no lip service. aquino has in fact ACTED on this policy – he has not used the wang wang starting from the time he drove from his house to luneta for his inauguration. ONE DAY after the inauguration, the PNP actually ACTED on this policy and confiscated dozens of wang wang from vehicles and hundreds more were removed since then.

    that is ACTION, right on day 1. absolutely no lip service there.

  6. July 9, 2010 at 8:47 am

    Joseph :

    from http://antipinoy.com/in-the-news-wall-street-journal-weighs-in-on-noynoys-first-two-days/#comment-18186

    Word has it that when Noynoy Aquino was still a candidate, there was a group in his billionaire-backed campaign team that was assigned to handle international media relations. As a result, Aquino received positive coverage from some foreign news outlets. This added steam to the bandwagon effect Philippine media was doggedly building around his campaign.

    Now that he is president, Aquino’s people are expected to devote much more effort than Gloria Arroyo ever did to managing his public image in the Philippines and overseas. That means more “media relations”.

    That makes these two articles published by the Asian Wall Street Journal during Aquino’s first two days in office all the more interesting to read. These two reports give an alternative point of view to the emo reporting of the yellow media, who in the days after Aquino’s inauguration pounced on his ‘wang-wang’ soundbite with a flood of newspaper editorials and TV reports, with one evening newscast devoting 15 to 30 minutes of coverage to the holy ‘wang-wang’ utterance as though Aquino had announced a cure for cancer.

    The first WSJ article is an op-ed published on June 30, 2010, the day of the inauguration. The second WSJ article is a news report published the next day, July 1, 2010.

    Here are some excerpts for you to mull over and share with people you know who are starved for grown-up, realistic reporting on Aquino.

    “NOYNOY’S PHILIPPINE PROMISES”
    The country needs investment, not bigger government and higher taxes
    WSJ, Opinion Asia, June 30, 2010

    It’s hard to find anything Benigno “Noynoy” Aquino III didn’t promise Filipinos in his inaugural address Wednesday…..But one big thing was missing: a solid program of economic reform.

    Mr. Aquino did acknowledge the need to make the Philippines “attractive to investors”…..That message will be especially well-received by foreigners who have largely shunned the country…..Yet in the same breath the new president also repeated populist promises he made on the campaign trail, including a nod to universal health care and education and government-run employment programs for the poor.

    Populism may be popular but it’s expensive, and it’s unclear how Mr. Aquino intends to pay for it…..Mr. Aquino says he’ll raise public monies by improving the country’s miserably low tax collection rates. Previous administrations have made similar pledges, with limited success. Corruption is endemic, and without a serious effort to prosecute big-name offenders Mr. Aquino won’t get far.

    A better approach would be to combine that anticorruption crackdown with a far-reaching growth agenda. Mr. Aquino could slash the country’s 30% corporate tax rate and simplify the tax system to encourage a positive cycle of investment, growth and job creation—and, eventually, more tax revenue. He could also work to liberalize trade and investment regimes and continue to sell off state assets.

    If he doesn’t, pressure will mount for him to raise taxes, which would send more investment fleeing. His own finance secretary, Cesar Purisima, was the primary cheerleader—also as finance secretary—behind the last government’s tax hikes. If he reverts to form, Mr. Aquino would do well to ignore him or install a more creative thinker.

    *****
    “AQUINO’S GRAFT PROBE SPARKS FEARS FOR ECONOMY”
    WSJ, Asia News, July 1, 2010

    A decision this week by Philippine president Benigno Aquino III to launch high-profile investigations into alleged corruption during his predecessor’s administration may help burnish his antigraft credentials. But it could also complicate his efforts to push much-needed economic and investment reforms, analysts warned.

    Swept into office in May largely on a promise to clean up Philippine politics, Mr. Aquino said Tuesday that one of his first acts will be to create a Truth Commission to probe the corruption he and his backers say flourished under former President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo.

    Mr. Aquino has suggested the commission will focus on cases involving Ms. Arroyo and her allies, many of whom retain powerful positions in the Philippine government and judiciary. Those include claims of fraud in Ms. Arroyo’s 2004 presidential-election victory and a case in which her husband allegedly received kickbacks in the award of a $330 million broadband contract to a Chinese company.

    The Arroyos have denied charges of wrongdoing and Ms. Arroyo ultimately canceled the broadband deal.

    Some of the biggest cases already have been investigated over recent years, but didn’t result in the high-level convictions some had sought. Critics of the latest effort, including some economists and political analysts, question whether the complaints merit more time and money—and potential fallout. Ms. Arroyo is a member of Congress, just elected in May, and still commands respect in some circles, including among many foreign investors who credit her with stabilizing the Philippine economy over the past decade. Those critics say they prefer Manila focus on fiscal reforms that will help lift the economy.

    Manila said it is focused on economic issues. But Mr. Aquino and many rank-and-file Filipinos also seek answers to the lingering allegations of fraud and graft.

    Many supporters of Mr. Aquino expect action from a man whose mother, the late Corazon Aquino, was lionized for taking on entrenched interests when she was president in the late 1980s. She dedicated much effort to investigating former dictator Ferdinand Marcos and his allies, who historians believe stole billions of dollars before he was succeeded by her following a 1986 People Power revolt.

    But some economists fault Corazon Aquino for allowing the anticorruption drive to take primacy over key financial reforms needed to prevent the Philippines from slipping behind faster-growing neighbors in Southeast Asia. They fear Mr. Aquino is following the same path.

    “Obviously it’s laudable to have goals of cleaning up government, but you also have to implement laws,” which requires a good relationship with other policy makers—including potentially some allied with Ms. Arroyo—says Frederic Neumann, an economist at HSBC in Hong Kong. “If you come in too aggressively to try to clean up corruption, that might backfire,” he adds.

    Whatever happens, “it will distract him from evolving his strategy,” says Alex Magno, a political-science professor at the University of the Philippines.

    Backers of Mr. Aquino argue that if he takes on graft, it will ultimately benefit the Philippines more than any other reforms by helping restore confidence that the country is governed by the rule of law. The Philippines ranked 139th out of 180 countries in a recent corruption index by Transparency International, a graft-watching group.

    what fears?

  7. jundp
    July 16, 2010 at 4:15 am

    blunders after blunders .. tsk tsk tsk ..

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