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barack obama’s post 2012 election victory speech & video

November 8, 2012 Leave a comment

Transcript: Obama’s victory speech

(CNN) – President Barack Obama delivered remarks Wednesday in Chicago. Read below for a transcript of Obama’s remarks.

OBAMA: Thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much.

Tonight, more than 200 years after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the task of perfecting our union moves forward.

(APPLAUSE)

OBAMA: It moves forward because of you. It moves forward because you reaffirmed the spirit that has triumphed over war and depression, the spirit that has lifted this country from the depths of despair to the great heights of hope, the belief that while each of us will pursue our own individual dreams, we are an American family and we rise or fall together as one nation and as one people.

(APPLAUSE)

Tonight, in this election, you, the American people, reminded us that while our road has been hard, while our journey has been long, we have picked ourselves up, we have fought our way back, and we know in our hearts that for the United States of America the best is yet to come.

(APPLAUSE)

OBAMA: I want to thank every American who participated in this election…

(APPLAUSE)

… whether you voted for the very first time or waited in line for a very long time.

(APPLAUSE)

By the way, we have to fix that.

(APPLAUSE)

Whether you pounded the pavement or picked up the phone…

(APPLAUSE)

… whether you held an Obama sign or a Romney sign, you made your voice heard and you made a difference.

I just spoke with Governor Romney and I congratulated him and Paul Ryan on a hard-fought campaign.

(APPLAUSE)

We may have battled fiercely, but it’s only because we love this country deeply and we care so strongly about its future. From George to Lenore to their son Mitt, the Romney family has chosen to give back to America through public service and that is the legacy that we honor and applaud tonight.

(APPLAUSE)

In the weeks ahead, I also look forward to sitting down with Governor Romney to talk about where we can work together to move this country forward.

(APPLAUSE)

I want to thank my friend and partner of the last four years, America’s happy warrior, the best vice president anybody could ever hope for, Joe Biden.

(APPLAUSE)

OBAMA: And I wouldn’t be the man I am today without the woman who agreed to marry me 20 years ago.

(APPLAUSE)

Let me say this publicly: Michelle, I have never loved you more. I have never been prouder to watch the rest of America fall in love with you, too, as our nation’s first lady.

(APPLAUSE)

Sasha and Malia, before our very eyes you’re growing up to become two strong, smart beautiful young women, just like your mom.

(APPLAUSE)

OBAMA: And I’m so proud of you guys. But I will say that for now one dog’s probably enough.

(LAUGHTER)

To the best campaign team and volunteers in the history of politics…

(APPLAUSE)

The best. The best ever. Some of you were new this time around, and some of you have been at my side since the very beginning.

(APPLAUSE)

But all of you are family. No matter what you do or where you go from here, you will carry the memory of the history we made together and you will have the life-long appreciation of a grateful president. Thank you for believing all the way, through every hill, through every valley.

(APPLAUSE)

You lifted me up the whole way and I will always be grateful for everything that you’ve done and all the incredible work that you put in.

(APPLAUSE)

I know that political campaigns can sometimes seem small, even silly. And that provides plenty of fodder for the cynics that tell us that politics is nothing more than a contest of egos or the domain of special interests. But if you ever get the chance to talk to folks who turned out at our rallies and crowded along a rope line in a high school gym, or saw folks working late in a campaign office in some tiny county far away from home, you’ll discover something else.

OBAMA: You’ll hear the determination in the voice of a young field organizer who’s working his way through college and wants to make sure every child has that same opportunity.

(APPLAUSE)

Read more…

obama-arroyo meeting: talks can touch on arroyo’s legacy (patay tayo dyan!)

July 30, 2009 Leave a comment

obama being elected as the first black president has made history in the US in a most major way. his taking on the presidency has inspired not only the whole nation of the america  but also many other countries around the world.

arroyo is the president of the philippines, a third world country where even her countrymen do not see favor in her. arroyo’s performance ratings have been on the negative quarter to quarter for many years based on nationwide surveys. her trust ratings has gone through the same dismal performance.

arroyo has violated the constitution a few times. election cheating has been a lingering issue that continue to be an open wound  where no closure has been achieved either way. allegations of corruption have been hurled a few times over  many years.

and the latest one is the unsaid plans of arroyo after 2010 – will she step down from power and transfer it to the next elected president of the country? arroyo would have laid that one ot rest in her last SONA but chose to pussyfoot on it.

if obama touches on arroyo’s legacy will be touched on as the State Department executive has said – what will obama say? what will arroyo say?

will arroyo whip up a powerpoint presentation too?

 

US STATE DEPT EXEC SAYS

Talks with Obama could touch on Arroyo legacy

By Gil C. Cabacungan Jr

WASHINGTON – The talks between President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo and US President Barack Obama have no fixed agenda and could touch on Ms Arroyo’s “legacy” when she leaves office next year, an official of the US Department of State said on Wednesday.

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/news/breakingnews/view/20090730-217904/Talks-with-Obama-could-touch-on-Arroyo-legacy

Arroyo-Obama Meeting – first visit by an southeast asian leader a mistake says Washington Times. Political cover for troubled Arroyo administration.

July 26, 2009 1 comment

The Washington Times

Sunday, July 26, 2009

EDITORIAL: Obama the sanitizer

Somebody at the National Security Council dropped the ball. On Thursday, President Obama is welcoming Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo to the White House for his presidency’s first visit by a Southeast Asian leader. The choice of Mrs. Arroyo for this honor was a mistake because Mr. Obama is being used to give political cover for the Philippine president’s troubles back home.

Mrs. Arroyo’s domestic political position is precarious. A poll released June 8 by the Pulse Asia polling firm pegged Mrs. Arroyo’s public approval at only 26 percent. Street demonstrations against her are routine and growing in size. These protests are in response to a dubious mandate following a dirty 2004 election and numerous allegations of corruption against her family and administration. Her husband, Mike Arroyo, has left the country and used doctors’ notes to say he is too ill to obey court summons related to corruption charges.

The Philippines has become less free during Mrs. Arroyo’s 10-year presidency. According to Freedom House, “Corruption is extensive throughout the Philippine state apparatus, from the lowest to the highest levels. Bribes and extortion seem to be a regular element of the complex connections among bureaucrats, politicians, businessmen, the press and the public.” In Transparency International’s 2008 Corruption Perceptions Index, the Philippines ranked 141st out of 180 nations on a list in which No. 1 is the least corrupt. The level of Philippine corruption is tied with Iran and Yemen and worse than in dodgy places such as Libya and Nigeria.

The corruption problem is affecting Manila’s relationship with other allies. A senior Philippine official told The Washington Times that German Chancellor Angela Merkel sent Mrs. Arroyo an ultimatum last month that Berlin-Manila ties are at risk if the Philippines doesn’t pay $60 million owed to the German government for Manila’s new international airport. The Philippine government seized the airport and refused to pay a German company — which is partly owned by the German state — for its construction after revelations that the contract allegedly was laden with millions in bribes and kickbacks.

There are also serious human-rights abuses in the archipelago. According to the New York-based Committee to Protect Journalists, “The Philippines ranks sixth worldwide among countries that fail to prosecute cases of journalists killed for their work.” Between 1992 and 2008, at least 34 journalists were murdered in the Philippines; there were convictions in only three of these cases. Four more members of the press were killed this June alone. Opposition voices regularly disappear as well.

On top of all this are machinations by Mrs. Arroyo to cling to power by setting aside next May’s presidential election. The president and her allies are pushing to amend the Philippine constitution to change the current U.S.-style presidential system into a parliamentary system whereby Mrs. Arroyo could serve as prime minister. This would allow her to circumvent the presidential term limit which prevents her from staying in office. This move, incidentally, is similar to the strategy strongman Ferdinand Marcos used to stay in power after declaring martial law in 1972.

The relationship between Washington and Manila is an old and important one. After the U.S. victory in the Spanish-American war in 1898, the Philippine islands were a U.S. colony for half a century and have remained a close ally in the six decades since independence was granted in 1946. The current Visiting Forces Agreement between the two countries allows U.S. troops on Philippine soil to help in the war on terrorism and to assist the Philippines with its fight against Islamic insurrection in the southern islands.

But the nation should be differentiated from its lame-duck leader. Welcoming Mrs. Arroyo to the White House only validates her troubled rule.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2009/jul/26/obama-the-sanitizer/print/

barack obama talks to gloria macapagal arroyo

January 22, 2009 Leave a comment

president barack obama did talk to president gloria macapagal arroyo and in a most special way. in his inaugural speech, barack said:

to gloria macapagal arroyo:

To those who cling to power through corruption and deceit and the silencing of dissent, know that you are on the wrong side of history; but that we will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist.

read full text of speech here: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/20/us/politics/20text-obama.html

Obama’s inauguration speech: Obama’s 10-year-old daughter, Malia, turned to him and blurted out: “First African-American president. Better be good.”

January 18, 2009 Leave a comment

we found this article at the NY Times after we posted the camelot II post.  we are printing it here in full.

——

The Past as a Guide for an Inaugural Address That Frames the Moment

WASHINGTON — On a family outing to the Lincoln Memorial last weekend, President-elect Barack Obama was starkly reminded by an unlikely adviser of what is at stake in his Inaugural Address.

As his family studied Lincoln’s inaugural words, carved into the memorial’s stone, they began discussing Mr. Obama’s own inaugural speech, he told CNN. His 10-year-old daughter, Malia, then turned to him and blurted out: “First African-American president. Better be good.”

That special burden just adds weight to a task that is already daunting — following his eloquent predecessors as he marks the peaceful transfer of power on Tuesday with an Inaugural Address, only the 56th in the nation’s history.

Mr. Obama has called Lincoln’s second inaugural speech “intimidating” and John F. Kennedy’s “extraordinary.” (Otherwise, he has said, “Some of the others are not so inspiring.”)

But since his 2004 keynote address to the Democratic National Convention, Mr. Obama has shown that he, too, is comfortable in the inaugural idiom. He writes with sweep, clarity and an eye toward history and in a style that Bob Shrum, a longtime Democratic consultant, calls a rare combination of the rhetorical and conversational.

Mr. Obama, who rose to prominence on his power as a speechmaker, has discussed his Inaugural Address with a certain detachment. He and his chief speechwriter, Jonathan Favreau, have been trading drafts back and forth for almost two months.

His primary goal, Mr. Obama says, is to define this moment in history.

“I think that the main task for me in an inauguration speech, and I think this is true for my presidency generally, is to try to capture as best I can the moment that we are in,” he told ABC News, adding that he would explain the “crossroads” where the country finds itself.

After that, he said, he wants to “project confidence that if we take the right measures, that we can once again be that country, that beacon for the world.”

Many inaugural speeches follow a somewhat classic formula of laying out the challenges before the nation and calling on basic American ideals to meet them.

But historians have high expectations for Mr. Obama, who, they say, is especially adept at framing the moment and reaching for a larger context.

“That’s one of the secrets of his success, rhetorically,” said Stephen Lucas, a professor of communication arts at the University of Wisconsin. “He seems very focused on the purpose of the moment.”

His victory speech on election night in Grant Park in Chicago provides a good example: “It’s been a long time coming,” Mr. Obama said, “but tonight, because of what we did on this day, in this election, at this defining moment, change has come to America.”

“Obama loves defining the moment, setting the scene,” said Mr. Shrum, who penned the “dream shall never die” speech for Senator Edward M. Kennedy of Massachusetts in 1980. “That’s what the great Inaugural Addresses, the ones that last, do.”

Mr. Obama’s primary themes are unity and hope, and they recur frequently, as does a call to service and a reliance on American ideals.

“He goes back to those fundamental themes of American greatness and the fundamental principles, like fairness,” said Shel Leanne, author of “Say It Like Obama,” a primer on his rhetorical technique. “He always tries to create common ground. He immediately starts building a bridge.”

Mr. Obama takes office in the first transition of power since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and it will be the first wartime transition in 40 years. Despite the nation’s economic woes, Theodore C. Sorensen, who was John Kennedy’s speechwriter and longtime adviser, said Mr. Obama should keep his focus on the country’s international standing.

“That Inaugural Address is going to define his presidency in the eyes of the rest of the world,” Mr. Sorensen said. It should be “bipartisan in tone and global in reach,” he added, while leaving prescriptions for most domestic matters, like health care, for an address to Congress next month.

“If I were to fault him,” Mr. Sorensen volunteered, “I would say that occasionally his sentences and words are not always short.”

Analysts said Mr. Obama needed to create a sense of urgency, especially about the economy, to bring the public along with him and make Congress feel compelled to work with him.

Some of his tasks are inherently contradictory: give a realistic assessment about the perils facing the country without portraying them as overwhelming; raise hopes and instill confidence without overpromising what he might be able to accomplish; and represent the change he has promised without insulting his predecessor.

“He doesn’t want to create the feeling that he will magically solve all of these pretty difficult problems right away,” said Ted Widmer, a former speechwriter for President Bill Clinton and now a historian at Brown. “At the same time he does want to create the feeling that the problems are ultimately solvable.”

In a recent speech at George Mason University that may prefigure the style and substance of the inaugural, Mr. Obama gave a bleak assessment of the economy but found seeds of hope within the American spirit.

“Now, the very fact that this crisis is largely of our own making means that it is not beyond our ability to solve,” he said. “Our problems are rooted in past mistakes, not our capacity for future greatness.”

Mr. Obama also posited the duality of his job with near-inaugural sweep in his speech in Grant Park.

“The road ahead will be long,” he said. “Our climb will be steep. We may not get there in one year or even in one term. But, America, I have never been more hopeful than I am tonight that we will get there. I promise you, we as a people will get there.”

Some analysts say that Mr. Obama’s best speeches are not remembered for specific lines but for their power over his audience.

“Not too many of us can spin out a quick Barack Obama sound bite that we’ve all memorized,” Mr. Widmer said. “But we all do feel mesmerized by his speeches. We do something that’s completely uncharacteristic for Americans — we listen to the entire speech.”

Mr. Obama’s speech in March in Philadelphia on race, for instance, was not instantly quotable, but was memorable for the fact of it and praised by supporters as honest and nuanced; it was one of the most watched political speeches on YouTube.

“We all stopped to listen to him as he explained this extremely complicated, sensitive topic,” Mr. Widmer said. “It was a teaching moment. He’s been unusually good at that. Not all presidents are good teachers, but he has shown great potential for that.”

And on Inauguration Day, many willing students will be listening.

source: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/01/18/us/politics/18speech.html?ref=politics

barack obama’s winning marketing strategies

December 2, 2008 Leave a comment

we are exporting to this blog the posts on Barack Obama’s Winning Marketing Strategies that were originally posted in WAWAM! (http://the-wawam-file.blogspot.com/).

we have posted Strategy No. 1 : Change and Strategy No. 2 : High-Ground. read about it here : https://2010presidentiables.wordpress.com/obamas-winning-marketing-strategies/

how the US presidential election was won : obama’s winning marketing strategies and mccain’s losing marketing strategies

November 26, 2008 Leave a comment

we’re starting to migrate posts from WAWAM! into this blog all topics related to the recently concluded US presidentiable elections.

we’re starting with the 2 most important topics:

click the links above or the titles at the top of this page.

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